Conservation of Metalwork

FdA Historic Craft Practices - Metalwork

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FdA Historic Craft Practices - Metalwork
Duration: 2 academic years (each 36 weeks) full time

Develop well-rounded metalworking theory and skills that will enhance your employment prospects or allow you to continue your studies in higher education. Projects become more challenging as the course progresses and encompasses both silversmithing and blacksmithing. You will be encouraged to understand historic craft practice in order to place your own work in a broader context and gain a keen understanding of the time needed for a piece of work in a creative, problem solving environment.

You can expect

  • To develop excellent practical skills
  • To learn how material properties influence practice and making
  • To learn historic metalwork techniques

Learning environment

  • Low student: tutor ratio
  • Workshop access 7am-10pm, 7 days a week
  • Interdisciplinary environment
  • Visits from specialists from the heritage and private sectors
  • Visits to museums and active links with heritage bodies

(Subject to re-validation)

Contact Hours

Teaching

You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, external trips and visits and workshop practicals. In addition, you have personal tutorials with your subject tutor.

At level 4 you typically have around 18-19 contact hours per week, typically consisting of:

  • 4-5 hours of lectures
  • 1 hour of seminars
  • 8 hours of supervised workshop practicals
  • 4 hours of external trips & visits (on average)
  • 1 hour of one-to-one meetings/tutorials

At level 5 you typically have around 16-17 contact hours per week, typically consisting of:

  • 3-4 hours of lectures
  • 1 hour of seminars
  • 7 hours of supervised workshop practicals
  • 4 hours of external trips & visits (on average)
  • 1 hour of one-to-one meetings/tutorials

Independent learning

When not attending lectures, seminars and workshop or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the library and preparing coursework assignments and presentations.

Overall workload

Level 4: 53% of your time is spent in scheduled teaching and learning activity
Scheduled teaching and learning: 633 hours, Independent learning: 567 hours

Level 5: 50% of your time is spent in scheduled teaching and learning activity
Scheduled teaching and learning: 600 hours, Independent learning: 600 hours

Programme Structure Year 1

Programme Structure Year 1

Programme Structure Year 2

Programme Structure Year 2

Facilities

You will work in our well-equipped metals workshop with areas for photography, analysis, chemicals, hot work (casting, soldering, and welding) and a machine shop. Adjacent to the workshop is the newly-built forge to which you will have access. Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

A well-equipped analytical laboratory is also available to students. The computer suite and on-site Art and Conservation Library puts thousands of specialist books, journals and databases within your reach.

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff points:120, completion of a level 3 qualification, for example A-Levels, BTEC, or Foundation Diploma in Art and Design.

Applicants can be considered if they can provide evidence of prior learning with an appropriate portfolio of work. You will be invited for a portfolio interview.

International applicants should provide a digital portfolio, evidence of English language ability to level B2 (IELTS 6.0) as well as equivalent level 3 qualifications.

Fees

UK/EU:

  • £4,130 per term (£12,390 per year)

International:

  • £4,130 per term (£12,390 per year)

Included is mandatory study trip costs of £400, which typically includes tailored visits to collections/exhibitions of specific interest to the programme of study.

Additional costs

Lunch, accommodation and other living expenses are additional, available on request.

Find out more about funding.

Careers

Graduates go on to further education or work as makers, repairers, restorers, teachers or advisors. There are many areas of specialism within the profession.

Tutors

Grant McCaig

Grant McCaig is an internationally recognised Silversmith and educator. His work is in several major collections including National Museums of Scotland, the Goldsmiths' Company, Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery and Aberdeen Art Gallery. He has taught in Japan and Colombia, is a selector for Cockpit Arts and mentor for the Crafts Council.

Dr Nicholas Pyall

Programme Co-ordinator FdA Historic Craft Practices

Nick specialises in instruments inspired by Viennese guitars of the early and mid-nineteenth century, including those with extra bass strings, and the mid-twentieth-century guitars of the North American 'golden era' of acoustic guitar making. In recent years his passion has led to him studying the instrument's development and societal history.

Program advisors

Hazel Newey: former Head of Conservation at the Science Museum
Richard Rogers: Richard Rogers Conservation
Alistair Dickenson: specialist in precious metalwork

How to apply

If you are interested in applying for this course or would like further information please contact admissions either by enquiring online or calling the number below. To make your application you will need to download and fill out our application form.

Apply now for Degree and Diploma study

Applications are welcome from UK/EU and International students.

The deadline for applications for 2019 entry is 1 March 2019 (with the exception of Conservation of Books and Library Materials, which is 1 February 2019).

Learn more about applying and entry

Find out about funding opportunities